Blood Clots - Deep Vein Thombosis : Nursing Course


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A blood clot that breaks loose from the vein and travels through the body is a:

embolus

Rationale: An embolus is a clot that breaks loose from the vein, and travel through the body until it becomes lodged at another site. The most common place that the clot will be become lodged is the lungs, creating a pulmonary embolism.


A blood clot that travels to the lungs is a:

pulmonary embolism

Rationale: A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a blood clot that generally starts as a DVT, then travels to the lungs. The clot blocks one or more arteries in the lungs, causing serious illness. Common symptoms of a PE are sudden and unexplained shortness of breath, chest pain, and a blood-tinged productive cough. A PE can be life-threatening, and needs immediate treatment. Administering anti-coagulant medications to patient with a PE can greatly reduce the risk of death.


A patient that has had a DVT will often times continue on anti-coagulant therapy at home, usually a pill called:

Coumadin

Rationale:

A patient that is at high risk of developing a DVT is one that has recently:

broken their leg

Rationale:

An invasive procedure in which a catheter is inserted into a vein, and a clot-busting medication is applied directly onto a clot is:

catheter-directed thrombolysis

Rationale:

Definitive diagnosis of a DVT can only be done by:

radiology imaging

Rationale:

Patient that are on Coumadin require a blood test called:

PT/INR

Rationale:

The formation of a blood clot in the a deep vein, predominately the legs, is a:

deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

Rationale:

The most common anti-coagulant given for DVT in the hospital setting is:

Heparin

Rationale:

The most common treatment for deep vein thrombosis is:

blood thinners (anti-coagulants)

Rationale:

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