Intravenous Fluids : Nursing Course


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An example of a commonly used isotonic solution is:

.9 sodium chloride

Rationale: The most commonly used isotonic solutions are .9 sodium chloride, lactated ringers, and D5W. These fluids are given to expand circulating fluid volume and replace actual fluid loss. .9 normal saline is commonly given to patients because of its immediate ability to expand the volume of circulating blood. D5w is an isotonic solution in the bag, but becomes a hypotonic solution once it enters the bloodstream.


An example of a hypertonic solution is one that contains more than:

10% dextrose

Rationale: Examples of hypertonic solutions are electrolyte replacement solutions and parenteral nutrition solutions. This would include solutions that contain more that 10% dextrose, or high electrolyte concentrations. Patients receiving hypertonic solutions should be monitored for circulatory overload. They should not be given to patients that have impaired kidney or heart function because they can not handle the extra fluid.


Most fluid in the body is found in the:

intracellular compartment

Rationale:

A commonly infused hypotonic solution is:

.45 sodium chloride

Rationale:

A crystalloid solution that has an osmolarity about equal to serum is:

isotonic solution

Rationale:

Fluid moves between the intracellular and extracellular compartments through:

osmosis

Rationale:

The two different classifications of IV fluids are:

crystalloid and colloid

Rationale:

A crystalloid solution with an osmolarity higher than serum is:

hypertonic solution

Rationale:

Fluid that is outside of the cells, such as intravascular fluid, interstitial fluid, and transcellular fluid is in the:

extracellular compartment

Rationale:

A crystalloid solution that has an osmolarity lower than serum is:

hypotonic

Rationale:

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