Pediatric Musculoskeletal Disorders : Nursing Course


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OR REVIEW THE FOLLOWING NURSING CLASS KNOWLEDGE BLOCKS


The act of rising to a standing position by using the hands and arms to “walk up the legs” is called:

Gower’s Sign.

Rationale: A clinical sign of muscular dystrophy in childhood, evidenced through observation of children’s use of their arms to push themselves erect by moving their hands up their thighs. This permits assuming the standing position from one of kneeling. The patient is unable to stand from a sitting position with the arms outstretched.


A childhood injury where a young, soft bone bends and partially breaks is referred to as:

a greenstick fracture.

Rationale: The softness and flexibility of a child’s bone can result in a greenstick fracture. In a greenstick fracture, the bone cracks but doesn't break all the way through — like when you try to break a green stick of wood.


The palpable sensation of the femoral head slipping into the acetabulum is referred to as:

Ortolani’s sign.

Rationale:

Human bones grow in width and length at growth plates called:

epiphyses.

Rationale:

The nurse assigned to care for a child with equinovarus would expect treatment to include:

progressive application of multiple casts.

Rationale:

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